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Use of Biostimulants and Buffers for Upset Recovery in Paper Mill Wastewater Systems

By Heather Jennings, PE

Industrial pulp and paper wastewater is considered one of the more challenging waters to treat using biological methods, which depend on microbial activity to effectively remediate the wastewater.

Wastewater treatment systems are often influenced/impacted by increased hydraulic and/or COD (chemical oxygen demand) loading as mills add new chemicals or otherwise modify mill operations. These events oftentimes inhibit the wastewater microbial activity, causing “upsets” and, potentially, discharge-limit violations. However, providing the necessary biostimulants and buffers to the microbial system—as we describe in this case study from a paper mill in China—can significantly improve system-upset recovery time and overall operational stability. Continue Reading

The Water Break Podcast, Episode #4: Activated Sludge System Operational Issues

“Where we bridge the gap between water plant operators and engineers”

In this podcast episode, host Heather Jennings, PE, interviews two highly experienced experts regarding operational issues related to activated-sludge wastewater systems:

  • Jim Huchel is the Water Reclamation Plant Manager for the City of Flagstaff, Ariz.
  • Dave Axton is the owner of Water Resources Management, Inc., and he is also a Probiotic Solutions® sales representative

Jim and Dave have over 80 years of combined experience in water plant operations.

REFERENCED IN THE PODCAST

Sulabh International Museum of Toilets

 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Contact Dave Axton at Water Resources Management (WRM)

WRM operates approximately 50 wastewater treatment plants and public water supplies. It has a full-scale wastewater lab where testing is performed for about 150 treatment plants. WRM also performs sludge profiles on various lagoon treatment systems, and it troubleshoots Industrial as well as domestic wastewater treatment plants. WRM also has a software division that designs and distributes water and wastewater management software for public and private utilities throughout the U.S.

Nitrification and Denitrification in Wastewater Activated Sludge

By Heather Jennings, PE

The great teetertotter of wastewater is the nitrification and denitrification cycle in activated sludge wastewater systems. It takes both to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas! Both processes feed off of and support each other but, in some ways, they have competing needs.

Nitrification consists of ripping off the hydrogen in ammonia and adding oxygen to make nitrates and nitritesthis is accomplished by bacteria that we call nitrifiers. You might be already familiar with some of these nitrifiers, such as Nitrosomonas, Nitrobacter, etc. I, personally, call nitrifiers the “divas” of wastewater. They can only tolerate specific conditions to really thrivesuch as a pH range of 6.58.0. They also require 7.1 lb of alkalinity for every 1 lb of ammonia that is oxidized, and they prefer temperatures at 77°F with DOs (dissolved oxygen levels) above 2mg/L. Retention times need to be longer than five hours, and the F:M (food to microorganism) ratios must ideally be less than 0.25. Basically, nitrifiers are screaming for their lattes to be a specific temperature and everything just right or they will refuse to work! Sadly, we can’t fire them. We have to learn how to meet their needs to get any nitrification done.   [Read more…]

Food Processing Wastewater Treatment Solutions

Cheese processing plant
Experience the world’s most efficient wastewater remediation products, for operational stability of food processing wastewater treatment facilities.
Continue reading.

Municipal Wastewater Solutions

Wastewater Treatment Plant
Experience the world’s most efficient wastewater remediation products, for operational stability of municipal wastewater treatment plants.
Continue reading.

Are You Using Wastewater Bioindicators?

By Jael Batty

Water quality can be evaluated quickly, efficiently, and cost-effectively through the use of bioindicators. The presence and activities of microorganisms can indicate changes in system operations and point to the source and magnitude of an issue.1

amoebae

amoebae

Protozoa

Approximately 4% of the microorganisms in wastewater are protozoa, which are single-celled aerobic microorganisms. Protozoa improve effluent clarity by digesting suspended particles and bacteria. Read more about wastewater bioindicators

Healthy Bacteria Are Vital to Wastewater Treatment

bacteria

By Jael Batty

Activated sludge is a mixture of microorganisms that come in contact with and digest biodegradable materials (food) from wastewater. Once most of the material is removed from the wastewater, microorganisms form floc and settle out as sludge. Some type of microorganism will always grow in the system. The organisms that will dominate will be the ones that are best suited to the environment.1

Microorganisms that are natural to the wastewater environment play a vital role in the wastewater treatment process. Beneficial bacteria, protozoa, metazoa, algae, and fungi feed on organic material in wastewater, breaking it down. Bacteria clump together, or floc, forming masses that settle and separate from wastewater liquids. This settled mass is called sludge. This week, we’re going to talk specifically about wastewater bacteria. Read more about wastewater bacteria

Bio Energizer, Micatrol & Bio Feed Reduce COD and Stabilize Wastewater Treatment for Plastic Producer

chartA plastic manufacturer in Taiwan needed a new process to efficiently treat elevated incoming chemical oxygen demand (COD) to comply with stringent EPA regulations for effluent discharge. The plant is an activated sludge treatment system with an influent of approximately 2,000 cubic meters per day (CMD) which is equivalent to approximately 530,000 gallons per day (GPD). The plant was unable to bring the plant into compliance using alternative technologies. 
Read more about treating elevated COD

Recovering Wastewater Treatment Activated Sludge Systems After Hurricane Irma

By Heather Jennings, PE

Hurricane Irma hit Southern Florida in early September as a Category 5 hurricane with winds of 180 miles per hour.  Due to flooding and lack of power, millions of gallons of untreated or partially treated wastewater were spilled or discharged from overwhelmed systems Continue reading

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