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Spring Is Coming and It’s Lagoon Time!

By Heather Jennings, PE

As winter loses its grip on us and we move toward spring, it’s finally time to start monitoring lagoons for seasonal turnover and stricter permit requirements. It’s also a great time to start bioremediation of your lagoon organic sludge!

With warmer weather it is easy to capitalize on those microorganisms that have been suppressed during the cooler months. A good example of this is a system we worked with in New Mexico that was dealing with irregular sludge build-up in their three lagoons. The system was modified to run in series relative to the influent rather than the short circuiting that took the first pond out of use. A 6-month test (later extended to 300 days) was developed in which Bio Energizer®, a bio stimulant, was administered to make nutrients more available to wastewater microorganisms.

Results: Pond 1 had a 12% sludge reduction, Pond 2 had a 36% reduction, and Pond 3 had a 24% reduction. The great thing is that no dredging expense was necessary, just daily application of Bio Energizer®.

To download/read the case study. click here for English or here for Spanish.

The Water Break Podcast, Episode 11: Everything You Wanted to Know About BOD Testing (But Were Afraid to Ask)

“Where we bridge the gap between water plant operators and engineers”

In Episode 11, Heather Jennings discusses wastewater BOD (biological oxygen demand) Testing and Lab Analysis with 2 guests: Rick Mealy, retired program chemist from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Laboratory Certification and Registration Program and president-elect of the Wisconsin Wastewater Operator Association’s (WWOA) Board of Directors, and George Bowman, retired lab manager and certification audit chemist.

Contact Rick Mealy at rickmealy1@gmail.com or through the Wisconsin Wastewater Operators’ Association

How to make Holy Water (according to Rick and George): Wait for the video on Slide 2. Click to Watch

Podcast References from Wanda’s Water Tidbit: Walking on Water

 

White Paper: Lagoons—Under the Surface

An In-Depth Investigation of Bioremediation and Biological Factors Involved in Reducing Sludge at a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facility Lagoon System

Heather Jennings, PE, Sr. Project Engineer, Probiotic Solutions®

Abstract

In this study, the operators of a municipal wastewater treatment facility with 4 lagoons had determined that their 2 primary lagoons—10-foot-deep, with 25-million-gallon holding capacity each—had reached sludge depths of 5–7 feet, putting the lagoons at risk of upset and seriously impacting the facility’s wastewater processing capacity. Continue Reading

Just Another Snake Oil?

by Heather Jennings, PE

For years, the wastewater industry has been plagued with products that meet only half the expectations of the users or make matters worse. I get it. I personally questioned the efficacy of Micro Carbon Technology® (MCT—the nutrient carrier for all our liquid nutrient and biostimulant products) when I started with Probiotic Solutions®. Because I was the Doubting Thomas of the group, I was assigned to conduct data analysis of projects and to work with our R&D group. My training is Chemical Engineering, so I was not looking for the easy answers. My customers deserve the best answers I can give them! [Read more…]

Use of Biostimulants and Buffers for Upset Recovery in Paper Mill Wastewater Systems

By Heather Jennings, PE

Industrial pulp and paper wastewater is considered one of the more challenging waters to treat using biological methods, which depend on microbial activity to effectively remediate the wastewater.

Wastewater treatment systems are often influenced/impacted by increased hydraulic and/or COD (chemical oxygen demand) loading as mills add new chemicals or otherwise modify mill operations. These events oftentimes inhibit the wastewater microbial activity, causing “upsets” and, potentially, discharge-limit violations. However, providing the necessary biostimulants and buffers to the microbial system—as we describe in this case study from a paper mill in China—can significantly improve system-upset recovery time and overall operational stability. Continue Reading

Our Most Popular Case Studies

Bioremediation can improve the activity and reproduction of wastewater microbiology. The following case studies used bioremediation to improve wastewater treatment conditions and operating costs.
Continue reading.

Are You Using Wastewater Bioindicators?

By Jael Batty

Water quality can be evaluated quickly, efficiently, and cost-effectively through the use of bioindicators. The presence and activities of microorganisms can indicate changes in system operations and point to the source and magnitude of an issue.1

amoebae

amoebae

Protozoa

Approximately 4% of the microorganisms in wastewater are protozoa, which are single-celled aerobic microorganisms. Protozoa improve effluent clarity by digesting suspended particles and bacteria. Read more about wastewater bioindicators

Healthy Bacteria Are Vital to Wastewater Treatment

bacteria

By Jael Batty

Activated sludge is a mixture of microorganisms that come in contact with and digest biodegradable materials (food) from wastewater. Once most of the material is removed from the wastewater, microorganisms form floc and settle out as sludge. Some type of microorganism will always grow in the system. The organisms that will dominate will be the ones that are best suited to the environment.1

Microorganisms that are natural to the wastewater environment play a vital role in the wastewater treatment process. Beneficial bacteria, protozoa, metazoa, algae, and fungi feed on organic material in wastewater, breaking it down. Bacteria clump together, or floc, forming masses that settle and separate from wastewater liquids. This settled mass is called sludge. This week, we’re going to talk specifically about wastewater bacteria. Read more about wastewater bacteria

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