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Spring Is Coming and It’s Lagoon Time!

By Heather Jennings, PE

As winter loses its grip on us and we move toward spring, it’s finally time to start monitoring lagoons for seasonal turnover and stricter permit requirements. It’s also a great time to start bioremediation of your lagoon organic sludge!

With warmer weather it is easy to capitalize on those microorganisms that have been suppressed during the cooler months. A good example of this is a system we worked with in New Mexico that was dealing with irregular sludge build-up in their three lagoons. The system was modified to run in series relative to the influent rather than the short circuiting that took the first pond out of use. A 6-month test (later extended to 300 days) was developed in which Bio Energizer®, a bio stimulant, was administered to make nutrients more available to wastewater microorganisms.

Results: Pond 1 had a 12% sludge reduction, Pond 2 had a 36% reduction, and Pond 3 had a 24% reduction. The great thing is that no dredging expense was necessary, just daily application of Bio Energizer®.

To download/read the case study. click here for English or here for Spanish.

White Paper: Lagoons—Under the Surface

An In-Depth Investigation of Bioremediation and Biological Factors Involved in Reducing Sludge at a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facility Lagoon System

Heather Jennings, PE, Sr. Project Engineer, Probiotic Solutions®

Abstract

In this study, the operators of a municipal wastewater treatment facility with 4 lagoons had determined that their 2 primary lagoons—10-foot-deep, with 25-million-gallon holding capacity each—had reached sludge depths of 5–7 feet, putting the lagoons at risk of upset and seriously impacting the facility’s wastewater processing capacity. Continue Reading

BIO ENERGIZER® Reduces Sludge 45% In One Year, Saves Municipal Plant $6 M In Dredging Costs

by Heather Jennings, PS

In this study, a one-year bioremediation plan featuring Bio Energizer® was implemented for a municipal wastewater treatment facility with 2 primary lagoons in which sludge depths had reached 5–7 feet. The lagoons were at risk of upset and wastewater processing capacity was reduced. 

Bio Energizer® was added via peristaltic pump to the lagoon inlets. Initially the dose applied was 7 ppm (7 gallons of product to 1,000,000 gallons of influent, assuming a typical Biochemical Oxygen Demand [BOD5] of 240 mg/L) and was eventually decreased 10 months later to 5 ppm. A maintenance dose of 3 ppm was established 2 months later.

Sludge levels were measured at baseline and quarterly. Sludge depth was biologically reduced by an average of 45%. This represented 17,810 dry tons of sludge that did not need to be mechanically removed and hauled to a disposal location, a potential savings of $6 million. When compared with product cost, and it was found that the facility product investment was 5.8% of the potential dredging costs.

To view the report, click here.

For more information about Bio Energizer®, click here.

Ducks Walking on Water?

by Heather Jennings, PE
Bio Energizer® Reduces Sludge Over 40% at Utah Municipal WTP

The case study described below was a project that I worked on with a small-lagoon municipal system so overwhelmed with solids that state action was being taken. The ducks on the other side of the lagoon from me literally looked as though they were walking on the water surface! Honestly, that was a new one for me. We can help prevent solids buildup with little capital costs and time! The case study is below. [Read more…]

Municipal Wastewater Solutions

Wastewater Treatment Plant
Experience the world’s most efficient wastewater remediation products, for operational stability of municipal wastewater treatment plants.
Continue reading.

Healthy Bacteria Are Vital to Wastewater Treatment

bacteria

By Jael Batty

Activated sludge is a mixture of microorganisms that come in contact with and digest biodegradable materials (food) from wastewater. Once most of the material is removed from the wastewater, microorganisms form floc and settle out as sludge. Some type of microorganism will always grow in the system. The organisms that will dominate will be the ones that are best suited to the environment.1

Microorganisms that are natural to the wastewater environment play a vital role in the wastewater treatment process. Beneficial bacteria, protozoa, metazoa, algae, and fungi feed on organic material in wastewater, breaking it down. Bacteria clump together, or floc, forming masses that settle and separate from wastewater liquids. This settled mass is called sludge. This week, we’re going to talk specifically about wastewater bacteria. Read more about wastewater bacteria

Bio Energizer® Cuts Sludge Hauling Costs for Potato Wastewater Treatment Plant

Potato Wastewater TreatmentA wastewater treatment plant in Pennsylvania was experiencing process control problems when new potato waste stream flows increased by 26%. The additional load was causing filamentous issues in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR), settlability problems, and increased sludge hauling costs.

The engineer was unable to maintain the 8-foot decant level in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR). He couldn’t decant more than 2–3 feet under the excess load.
Read more about reducing sludge handling costs

Bio Energizer® Improves SVI by 50% at Citrus Plant Wastewater Treatment

citrus production

A citrus plant struggled with poor settling in the clarifier of its wastewater treatment, which caused the sludge blanket to remain high. Even at a low flow rate of 1.2 million gallons per day (MGD), the high sludge blanked allowed less than 18” of free board. The slightest flow increase caused solids to carry over the weir with the effluent. Since the citrus plant frequently produced wastewater flows 1.5 to 2.5 MGD, the wastewater treatment plant continued to suffer from solids washout and clarifier effluent total suspended solids (TSS) excursions. The citrus plant wastewater treatment was a 6 million gallon per day (MGD) traditional aeration system with secondary clarification.
Read more about improving SVI

Bio Energizer, Micatrol & Bio Feed Reduce COD and Stabilize Wastewater Treatment for Plastic Producer

chartA plastic manufacturer in Taiwan needed a new process to efficiently treat elevated incoming chemical oxygen demand (COD) to comply with stringent EPA regulations for effluent discharge. The plant is an activated sludge treatment system with an influent of approximately 2,000 cubic meters per day (CMD) which is equivalent to approximately 530,000 gallons per day (GPD). The plant was unable to bring the plant into compliance using alternative technologies. 
Read more about treating elevated COD

BIO ENERGIZER® Reduces Sludge at Sugar Refinery Wastewater Treatment Lagoons

Location: Louisiana

A large sugar refinery struggled with elevated BOD and COD values in its wastewater treatment lagoons due to the sugar refinery process. The lagoon wastewater system capacity was 25 million gallons with an influent of 1.25 million gallons per day. The wastewater system also suffered from accumulating sludge as well as significant odor issues. The sugar refinery had a history of periodically being unable to meet its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting requirements. Continue reading

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